United Way Day of Action – Stuff the Bus

busWe all have a stake in ensuring children are successful.

United Way’s Day of Action is an annual event when we reach out to the community to help us put our mission into action by improving the building blocks for a quality life. We want to send kids back to school fully equipped to learn.  

Bring your donations to United Way of Central Oklahoma, 1444 NW 28, between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. June 20 through 24.  Or bring them to the Pacesetter Games!

 

Click here to learn more!

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Storm Safe Room Giveaway

facebook giveawayThe Oklahoma AFL-CIO IS offering one 4′X6′ safe room (valued at $4,250) to one of our union members.  The contest will begin May 15 and a winner will be drawn on July 1.  To enter to win, you must “Like” Oklahoma AFL-CIO’s Facebook page, “Share” the post about the storm shelter, and “Comment” on the post.  On July 1 an AFL-CIO union member in good standing who completed all three requirements will be drawn at random by the Oklahoma AFL-CIO and will be notified on how to claim their new storm shelter! 

Click here for more information!

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IBEW 1141 Members Volunteer at OKC Memorial Marathon

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Stamp Out Hunger!

Fstamp out hungeror more than 20 years, the National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC) has conducted an annual nationwide food drive on the second Saturday in May.

The Food Drive effort is the nation’s largest single-day drive. In 2015, 70.6 million pounds of food was collected, which brought the grand total of donations to more than 1.3 billion pounds of food collected since the drive began in 1992.

How to Donate

1. Collect and place non-perishable food items in the Stamp Out Hunger bag placed in your mailbox the week of May 7, 2016 OR any plastic bag
2. Place by your mailbox by 7 a.m. on Saturday, May 14th for your local letter carrier to deliver to the Food Bank
3. OR visit any area Reasor’s location to drop off your bag, purchase a pre-packaged bag with our most needed items or donate funds at the register.

Click here to see this events Facebook page.         

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Union Member Highlight – Torie Shoecraft

torieTorie Shoecraft grew up with a passion for teaching, passed down from her mother, a teacher in Edmond.  She decided to carry on the family tradition of education and graduated from the University of Central Oklahoma with her Early Childhood Education Degree, Torie is now a kindergarten teacher at Nichols Hills Elementary and a member of the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) Local 2309.   

Torie is set to complete her Masters in Reading this year from and is in the process of becoming Nationally Board Certified, but her real passion is her students. 

“What makes my job so special is helping give kids the tools they need to succeed, although it’s often really challenging, it is incredibly rewarding.”

Click here to read more.

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This is How March Became Women’s History Month

“Women’s history is women’s right”

Many things have come to womankind surprisingly recently: The right to vote. The right to own property. And, perhaps less surprisingly, the existence of Women’s History Month.Before women had the whole month, the U.S. recognized Women’s History Week; before that, a single International Women’s Day. Dedicating the whole month of March in honor of women’s achievements may seem irrelevant today. But at the time of the conception of Women’s History Week, activists saw the designation as a way to revise a written and social American history that had largely ignored women’s contributions.The celebratory month has its roots in the socialist and labor movements — the first Women’s Day took place on Feb. 28, 1909, in New York City, as a national observance organized by the Socialist Party. It honored the one-year anniversary of the garment worker’s strikes in New York that had taken place a year earlier, when thousands of women marched for economic rights through lower Manhattan to Union Square. (That strike in turn honored an earlier 1857 march, when garment workers rallied for equal rights and a 10-hour day.) Within two years, Women’s Day had grown into an international observance that spread through Europe on the heels of socialism.

Read full article here.

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